Detailed Schedule

Thursday August 4th 2016

Early Bird Workshop (optional addition for $35)- .3 CEUs 1:00-4:00

Kevin Dyels: ‘Behind the Scenes’

Workshop/Course Description:

Learn about interpreted theatre and concert performances from the perspective of the theatre staff.   Participants will learn about Theatre Staff and crew positions and roles; Theatre Jargon; Pre Show Preparations and Logistical considerations.  Through lecture, discussion and role play activities participants will learn about the process of working with theatres from the moment a Deaf consumer makes a request for tickets all the way through the process to the final Curtain Call.

Educational Objectives:

  1. List the steps required in researching a show;
  2. Describe the steps needed in order to cultivate professional relationships;
  3. List and describe the basic theatre concepts

Registration- 4:00-6:00
Welcome Reception- 6:00-7:00
Keynote Address- .2 CEUs 7:00-9:00

Meet and Greet at the Balcony Bar- 9:00-Until

Friday August 5th 2016

Deaf-Blind Membership Meeting Canceled- 7:30-8:30
Morning Workshop Tracks- .3 CEUs 8:30-11:30

Option 1-

Janis Cole & Sherrette Garate-Estes: ‘Interpreters’ Collaboration: The art of Intricacies’

Workshop Description:

We have all heard or experienced the frustration of an interpreting situation that was less than successful for a Deaf person. Interpreters share these frustrations as well, and at times even experience a sense of helplessness when they cannot meet the Deaf person’s expectations in the interpreting situation. These challenging situations will be discussed and how you and your interpreter can come up with solutions to get through those trying times. We will discuss the idea of what it means to prepare your interpreter, cultural considerations of various settings, and having productive conversations about needs and expectations. In addition, we will examine the stories of our own and our peers within the lens of ethical and professional response and learn strategies for having sensitive and productive conversations.

Educational Objectives:

  1.  Identify Deaf and interpreting community paradigm shifts
  2.  To have a better understanding of what interpreters need to work effectively.
  3.  To be able to clearly explain needs and expectations to interpreters/consumers/professionals.
  4.  Recognize challenges with both Deaf and hearing interpreters and create collaborate problem-solving approaches to support one another

Option 2-

Kathy Stoehr & Tom Mayne: ‘SSI, SSDI, and BPQY? Lions and Tigers and Bears, Oh My! The Language of Social Security – How Do We Interpret It?’
Workshop Description:
Communication with the Social Security Administration (SSA) is generally complicated and can have long lasting impact on beneficiaries. One cannot provide effective communication access in a target language, if one does not understand the meaning and intent of the communication presented in the source language. The content of this training will prepare interpreters to work more effectively in settings where SSA information is presented. It will focus on strategies to construct more visually appropriate and conceptually accurate ASL interpretations of SSA programs. Current SSA programs, concepts, vocabulary, time frames, thresholds, and regulations will be defined and explained. Calculations for reporting earned income will be presented and practiced. Participants will work in small groups to refine their understanding of the SSA information discussed and form effective ASL interpretations of the concepts. The use of Deaf Interpreters will be explored and emphasized.

Educational Objectives:
1. Participants will list at least three (3) challenges of interpreting or working with an interpreter in the SSA setting.
2. Participants will demonstrate understanding of SSA programs; vocabulary, time frames, thresholds and regulations by restating the information.
3. Participants will analyze and explain the relationship between earned income, SSA, SSI and SSDI benefits.
4. Participants will defend the above analysis based on SSA regulations for SSA, SSI and SSDI.
5. Interpreters will demonstrate ASL interpretations of at least five (5) concepts presented.
6. Participants will demonstrate at least two (2) strategies for establishing rapport with the SSA service provider.  Interpreters will demonstrate how to ask for clarification and more time to complete the interpretation.
7. Participants will cite at least two (2) ways to make the content of the SSA communication more visual.

Option 3-

Hilary Mayhew: ‘Planning (or Choosing) Constructive Privilege, Power, & Oppression Trainings’ Part 1

Workshop Description:

RID members at the 2015 National Conference passed a motion to require privilege, power, and oppression CEUs. But training on these issues can be controversial or uncomfortable; research shows the impact of these trainings is generally positive, but sometimes neutral or even negative. How can we channel positive intentions of these trainings into positive impact? The workshop will first share research that helps us understand the various perspectives and reactions people bring to these trainings. Next, we will compare best practices from other helping professions with results from the presenter’s recent survey of interpreters’ experiences. Come examine how you can apply these lessons in your work or organization.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Consider the desired outcomes and impact of power, privilege, and oppression training, for themselves or their communities
  2. Explore evidence-based practices that support their desired outcomes, including common pitfalls and possible strategies to avoid them
  3. Explain at least one model of intercultural competency and identity development, and identify resources for learning about additional models
  4. Explain how the model(s) can be incorporated into education on power, privilege, and oppression, to create positive outcomes
  5. Compare best practice research from other helping professions to training experiences among sign language interpreters (based on findings from a recent survey)
  6. Develop the knowledge and skills needed to plan or select effective trainings or professional development plans on these topics (for themselves, or their organizational members, mentees, students, etc).
  7. Identify resources and strategies for creating supportive, accountable, effective learning communities on topics related to power, privilege, and oppression

Lunch Break- 11:30-12:30
Professional Development Committee Forum- 12:30-2:00- .15 CEUs
Afternoon Workshop Tracks- .3 CEUs 2:00-5:00

Option 1-

Sarah Wheeler: ‘Social Media Impact & Influences on the Interpreting Field’

Workshop Description:

Whether you are a beginner or an experienced interpreter, this workshop invites you to partake in an engaging and meaningful dialogue regarding social media and the impacts on how interpreters work. We will also focus on confidentiality, and how it changes the dynamic of relationships we have with other professional interpreters, the Deaf community, and stakeholders within our field. This workshop will integrate the Code of Professional Conduct along with standard practice papers from various professions to discuss our professions approach to social media.

Educational Objectives:

Participants will be able to evaluate their own use of social media. They will also leave being able to better understand how to analyze stakeholder impacts from the misuse of group media through the Code of Professional Conduct as well as other professional practice papers.

Option 2-

Daniel Maffia: ‘Biomechanics for Interpreters’
Workshop Description:
This workshop will provide background information on the unfortunate common occurrence of musculoskeletal pain in sign language interpreters. Half of the workshop will be in lecture format and half will be facilitated, almost like an exercise class. Some of the exercises will be performed as a group and some will be performed at various stations set-up around the room. The learning will be fun and definitely, interactive. Sign language interpreters of all physical levels are encouraged to participate.

Educational Objectives:
1. Cite available research information on how stress can increase the risk of cumulative trauma disorder, on the interpreting settings with the highest occupational health risks and on the rate of incidence of musculoskeletal pain
2. Explain proper posture and the components of safe upper extremity biomechanics.
3. Understand how posture and biomechanics relates to interpreter-related injuries.
4. Identify their external and personal risks of cumulative trauma disorder.
5. Learn the physical and psychological benefits of exercise in managing/preventing pain.
6. Define the common conditions of physical pain presentation seen in sign language interpreters.
7. Learn strategies of how to manage/prevent pain, like exercise, bracing and stress management.
8. Actively participate, if able to tolerate, in stretching and strengthening exercises.
9. Easily follow-thru on exercises learned well beyond their participation in this workshop via use of handouts and small pieces of exercise equipment that will be distributed.

Option 3-

Hilary Mayhew: ‘Planning (or Choosing) Constructive Privilege, Power, & Oppression Trainings’ Part 2

Workshop Description:

RID members at the 2015 National Conference passed a motion to require privilege, power, and oppression CEUs. But training on these issues can be controversial or uncomfortable; research shows the impact of these trainings is generally positive, but sometimes neutral or even negative. How can we channel positive intentions of these trainings into positive impact? The workshop will first share research that helps us understand the various perspectives and reactions people bring to these trainings. Next, we will compare best practices from other helping professions with results from the presenter’s recent survey of interpreters’ experiences. Come examine how you can apply these lessons in your work or organization.

Educational Objectives:

  1. Consider the desired outcomes and impact of power, privilege, and oppression training, for themselves or their communities
  2. Explore evidence-based practices that support their desired outcomes, including common pitfalls and possible strategies to avoid them
  3. Explain at least one model of intercultural competency and identity development, and identify resources for learning about additional models
  4. Explain how the model(s) can be incorporated into education on power, privilege, and oppression, to create positive outcomes
  5. Compare best practice research from other helping professions to training experiences among sign language interpreters (based on findings from a recent survey)
  6. Develop the knowledge and skills needed to plan or select effective trainings or professional development plans on these topics (for themselves, or their organizational members, mentees, students, etc).
  7. Identify resources and strategies for creating supportive, accountable, effective learning communities on topics related to power, privilege, and oppression

Dinner Break- 5:00-6:30
Deaf in the Music Industry- .2 CEUs 6:30-8:30
Deaf Performer WAWA and DJ Nicar- 9:00-10:30
DJ WaWa Dance Party- 10:30-12:00

Saturday August 6th 2016

Healthcare Membership Meeting- 7:30-8:30
Morning Workshop Tracks- .3 CEUs 8:30-11:30

Option 1-

Daniel Maffia: ‘So What? The value of DC-S and Supervision’ Part 1
Workshop Description:
What value does talking with colleagues about the decisions you make during an interpreting assignment have?  The purpose of this workshop is to give an overview of the constructs of Dean & Pollard’s Demand-Control schema and update participants on current research and best practices process for utilizing the model.  Participants will learn how this decision making model can overlay current cognitive process models that we already use.  In his book, The Courage to Teach, Parker Palmer says, “The growth of any craft depends on shared practice and honest dialogue among the people who do it.”  Supervision is a structured way professionals dialogue about their work with one other in order to analyze decisions made during interpreting assignments. Participants will view a videotaped supervision session and discuss how supervision can be applied to our own work.  Other practice professions use this approach to help move their work to the next level.  This workshop will help inform your work immediately when you step into an assignment.

Educational Objectives:
1. To gain hands-on experience applying the D-C schema through the use of situational analysis tools.
2. To understand and accurately identify the elements in supervisory conversations that create a “best practice process.”
3. To learn how to use these teaching tools (situational analyses) with mentees, accounting both for the accurate application of the schema and in the teaching opportunities that emerge from these exercises.
4. To understand the use and benefits of the observation-supervision approach which builds on and utilizes the D-C schema for effective training in content-specific fields (e.g., medical, mental heath, legal)

Option 2-

Hilary Mayhew & Beverly Hollrah: ‘Charting a Path to Competency in Healthcare Interpreting: Using a Career Lattice to Define Entry to Specialized Practice’

Workshop Description:

Are you ready to interpret in healthcare settings, and how do you know? How do healthcare providers know if the interpreters they work with are ready for the task? Research shows that better communication between providers and patients leads to better healthcare outcomes (Street, 2009) and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was designed to increase access to healthcare for patients through improved communication (ACA, 2010). Yet American Deaf consumers report the most difficulty finding available and qualified interpreters in healthcare settings (Cokely, 2009).
This presentation will lead participants through a new interactive, online tool, The Healthcare Interpreting Career Lattice, designed for interpreters to better understand the path to healthcare interpreting competency.

Educational Objectives:

  1.  identify the specific advantages of the Healthcare Interpreting Career Lattice for attracting qualified individuals to the specialty of healthcare interpreting.
  2. analyze how the Career Lattice can guide members’ professional development in healthcare interpreting
  3.  identify ways the Career Lattice can provide critical, specific information to interpreters at all levels, about the training, education, and experiences that lead to greater expertise.
  4. Explain how the Lattice can be used as a guide for people in various roles (e.g. interpreters, mentors, educators, healthcare administrators, academic advisers, students and potential students) to outline career pathways and the critical experiences individuals should acquire to enter and succeed in a healthcare interpreting career

Option 3-

Sarah Wheeler: ‘The Blurred Lines of Educational Interpreting’

Workshop Overview:

This workshop is designed to provide a forum where educational interpreters can come together and discuss their roles in the school system. Participants will learn more about their roles in the classroom, understand what they do in the classroom, and discuss strategies that can allow interpreters to empower students in their own learning experience.

Educational Objectives:

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to gain a better understanding of their role in the school system. Learn how to empower students in their own learning experience. Understand and articulate how to educate and advocate the role as an educational interpreter to others.

Lunch Break- 11:30-12:30
Business Meeting- 12:30-1:30
Afternoon Workshop Tracks- .3 CEUs 1:30-4:30

Option 1-

Daniel Maffia: ‘So What? The value of DC-S and Supervision’ Part 2
Workshop Description:
What value does talking with colleagues about the decisions you make during an interpreting assignment have?  The purpose of this workshop is to give an overview of the constructs of Dean & Pollard’s Demand-Control schema and update participants on current research and best practices process for utilizing the model.  Participants will learn how this decision making model can overlay current cognitive process models that we already use.  In his book, The Courage to Teach, Parker Palmer says, “The growth of any craft depends on shared practice and honest dialogue among the people who do it.”  Supervision is a structured way professionals dialogue about their work with one other in order to analyze decisions made during interpreting assignments. Participants will view a videotaped supervision session and discuss how supervision can be applied to our own work.  Other practice professions use this approach to help move their work to the next level.  This workshop will help inform your work immediately when you step into an assignment.

Educational Objectives:
1. To gain hands-on experience applying the D-C schema through the use of situational analysis tools.
2. To understand and accurately identify the elements in supervisory conversations that create a “best practice process.”
3. To learn how to use these teaching tools (situational analyses) with mentees, accounting both for the accurate application of the schema and in the teaching opportunities that emerge from these exercises.
4. To understand the use and benefits of the observation-supervision approach which builds on and utilizes the D-C schema for effective training in content-specific fields (e.g., medical, mental heath, legal)

Option 2-

Hilary Mayhew & Beverly Hollrah: ‘Richer in Resources Than You Realized: Taking full advantage of NCIEC products‘

Workshop Description:

You have probably used resources from the National Consortium of Interpreter Education Centers (NCIEC), but so many products have been created over the past five years that there are surely some you’ve missed! From webinars, to best practice research, to curriculum on specialized interpreting, NCIEC has something for professional goals at all levels. We’ll lead participants through engaging activities designed to support your goals. What new resources can you discover? What new uses can you create for using the resources you’re already familiar with? What resources are on your wishlist? This interactive workshop will showcase practical resources and the creative ways you can use them.

Educational Objectives:

  1. identify at least 3 new NCIEC resources they weren’t previously aware of or using
  2. create at least 2 new ways to use NCIEC resources that they were previously aware of or using
  3. create at least one activity, using NCIEC resources, that they can apply to their professional development goals
  4. collaborate with colleagues to take advantage of NCIEC resources in their workplace/education program
  5. explain where to locate centralized information about NCIEC (interpretereducation.org) and how to stay connected with NCIEC events

Option 3-

Anna Masson & Jesse Fuller: ‘At the Intersection of LGBT and D/HOH’

Target Audience:
Interpreters of varying levels of experience who desire to increase their knowledge base surrounding terminology commonly-used in the LGBT+ Community in both spoken/written English and American Sign Language, as well as gain insight into the intersectionality of the Queer and Deaf experiences – ASL/English interpreters of varying levels of experience

Workshop/Course Description:

Become familiar with terminology specific to the LGBT+ Community in both written/spoken English and American Sign Language while exploring issues related to sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression in a safe space.  Gain understanding of the various and complex experiences of minority groups due to the intersectionality of identities, and further examine the intersecting identities of Deaf Culture and the queer experience.

LGBTQ+ Membership Meeting- 4:30-5:30
IDP Membership Meeting- 5:30-6:30
Dinner Break- 6:30-
Carriage Tour (optional addition for $14)

Sunday August 7th 2016

Discussion Panel- 8:00-9:00
Closing Workshop- .3 CEUs 9:00-12:00

Sarah Wheeler: ‘Being an Ally. Am I Friend or Foe?’

Workshop Description:
Participants will be presented with a historical narrative on audism and oppression within the larger context of society. Other topics covered will be Deaf culture, societal privilege, social justice, exploring personal views/biases, discovering common language biases, interpreting roles in and out of an educational setting, ally roles and audism.

Educational Objectives:

By the end of this course, participants will be able to outline what the term ally means in conjunction to the Deaf community.  Participants will be able to discuss and identify their own personal views on allies and social justice.   Also they will be able to apply how allyship could apply to the profession on a micro and macro level.